The Battle of Dunkirk (French: Bataille de Dunkerque) was fought in Dunkirk (Dunkerque), France, during the Second World War, between the Allies and  Germany. As the Allies were losing the Battle of France on the Western Front, the Battle of Dunkirk was the defence and evacuation to Britain of British and other Allied forces in Europe from 26 May to 4 June 1940.


 
Dunkirk and After

From Captain Archibald Maule Ramsay's book: THE NAMELESS WAR


Captain Liddell Hart, the eminent military critic, wrote a book on the military events of
1939-45, which was published in 1948, and entitled The Other Side of the Hill.

Chapter 10 -- which deals with the German invasion of France down to and including
Dunkirk -- bears the somewhat startling title, "How Hitler beat France and saved
Britain."

The reading of the chapter itself will astound all propaganda-blinded people, even
more than the title: for the author therein proves that not only did Hitler save this
country; but that this was not the result of some unforeseen factor, or indecision, or
folly, but was of set purpose, based on his long enunciated and faithfully maintained
principle.

Having given details of how Hitler peremptorily halted the Panzer Corps on the 22nd
May, and kept them inactive for the vital few days, till, in fact, the British troops had got
away from Dunkirk, Captain Liddell Hart quotes Hitler's telegram to Von Kleist:

"The armoured divisions are to remain at medium artillery range from Dunkirk.
Permission is only granted for reconnaissance and protective movements."

Von Kleist decided to ignore the order, the author tells us. To quote him again:

"Then came a more emphatic order, that I was to withdraw behind the canal. My
 
 
tanks were kept halted there for three days."

In the following words the author reports a conversation which took place on May 24th
(i.e. two days later) between Herr Hitler and Marshal Von Runstedt, and two key men
of his staff:

"He then astonished us by speaking with admiration of the British Empire, of the
necessity for its existence, and of the civilisation that Britain had brought into the
world ...

He compared the British Empire with the Catholic Church -- saying they were
both essential elements of stability in the world. He said that all he wanted from
Britain was that she should acknowledge Germany's position on the continent.
The return of Germany's lost colonies would be desirable, but not essential, and
he would even offer to support Britain with troops, if she should be involved in
any difficulties anywhere.

He concluded by saying that his aim was to make peace with Britain, on a basis
that she would regard compatible with her honour to accept."

Captain Liddell Hart comments on the above as follows:

"If the British Army had been captured at Dunkirk, the British people might have
felt that their honour had suffered a stain, which they must wipe out. By letting it
escape, Hitler hoped to conciliate them. This conviction of Hitler's deeper motive
was confirmed by his strangely dilatory attitude over the subsequent plans for the
invasion of England."

"He showed little interest in the plans," Blumentritt said, "and made no effort to
speed up the preparation. That was utterly different to his usual behaviour.
Before the invasion of Poland, of France, and later of Russia, he repeatedly
spurred them on; but on this occasion he sat back."

The author continues:

"Since the account of his conversation at Charleville, and subsequent holding
back, comes from a section of the Generals, who had long distrusted Hitler's
policy, that makes their testimony all the more notable."

And later he goes on to say:

"Significantly their account of Hitler's thoughts about England at the decisive
hour before Dunkirk, fits in with much that he himself wrote earlier in Mein
Kampf; and it is remarkable how closely he followed his own Bible in other
respects."
 
Anyone who has read Mein Kampf will immediately appreciate the accuracy of the
above statement. It is indeed if anything an understatement. Throughout that
remarkable book runs two main themes, as I have shown in an earlier chapter -- the
one, a detailed delineation and denunciation of the Jewish Capitalist-Revolutionary
machine; the other, admiration for and eagerness for friendship with Britain and the
Empire.

It is a pity, indeed, that so few persons in this island have read this book for
themselves; and it is a tragedy that they have instead swallowed wholesale, the
unscrupulous distortions and untrue propaganda on the subject, served up to them by
Jewish publicity machinery, operating through our press and radio.

Let these people but try and obtain a copy of that book; and when they find they
cannot, let them reflect, that if indeed its contents confirmed the lies that they
have been told concerning it and its author, the powers behind our publicity
would ensure that everyone should be able to secure a copy at the cheapest
possible rate.

In any event, I would urge my countrymen to ponder most earnestly the following facts.
The Jew Karl Marx laid it down, that Bolshevism could never really succeed till
the British Empire had been utterly destroyed.

Hitler laid it down, that the British Empire was an essential element of stability in the
world; and even declared himself ready to defend it with troops, if it should be involved
in difficulties anywhere.

By unscrupulous propaganda on an unprecedented scale this country was led into
destroying those who wished to be her friends, and offered their lives to defend her;
and exalting those, who proclaimed that her destruction was a necessary preliminary
to the success of their ideology, forfeiting her Empire and her economic independence
in the process.